What is OSHA 10?

June 14, 2018 Matthew Ramage

When it comes to crew and jobsite safety, there are many regulations designed to help keep everyone out of harm’s way. Government regulations are defined by OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and are updated on a regular basis in order to account for new hazards and changing technology.

For anyone who has ever worked around large machinery, familiarity with OSHA standards isn’t just commonplace— it’s a requirement. But how do you prove that you’re OSHA compliant, and that you know how to follow these safety regulations? That’s where OSHA 10 comes in.

 

What does OSHA 10 cover?

OSHA 10 is an educational program designed to help workers learn, then demonstrate their awareness of, various safety regulations through a ten-hour course. There are three different certifications available:

  • Construction - For those who work on construction sites.

  • General Industry - For those who work around heavy machinery or face other workplace hazards in their jobs.

  • Maritime - For those who work in the maritime industry.

 

In the ten-hour course, participants learn about workplace safety specific to their industry. OSHA 10 is not required by OSHA and will not help meet the general OSHA requirements (yet), but is rather an extension of federal standards.

 

Construction 

After completing the construction training course, participants should be able to recognize:

  • Which workers’ rights are protected by OSHA

  • What responsibilities their employers have under OSHA

  • All major fall hazards

  • Common caught or in-between hazards

  • Common struck-by hazards

  • Electrocution hazards

  • Ways to select appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and other lifesaving equipment

  • Major health hazards common to the construction industry

  • How to protect oneself from material handling hazards

  • Major hand and power tool hazards

  • The role of the workforce in improving the current culture

  • The role of management in improving the current culture

 

General Industry

After completing the general industry training course, participants should be able to recognize:

  • Which workers’ rights are protected by OSHA

  • What responsibilities their employers have under OSHA

  • How to safely work in confined or enclosed spaces

  • How to prevent and protect from fires

  • Electrocution hazards

  • Ways to select appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and other lifesaving equipment

  • Major health hazards common to the maritime industry

  • How to protect oneself from material handling hazards

  • The makeup of chemical materials in the workplace

  • The hazards of major hand and power tools

  • The differences between chronic and acute health ailments

  • How to safely use a fixed or portable ladder

 

Maritime

After completing the maritime training course, participants should be able to recognize:

  • Which workers’ rights are protected by OSHA

  • What responsibilities their employers have under OSHA

  • All major fire hazards

  • How to prevent and protect from fires

  • Electrocution hazards

  • Ways to select appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and other lifesaving equipment

  • Major health hazards common to the maritime industry

  • How to protect oneself from material handling hazards

  • The makeup of chemical materials in the workplace

  • The hazards of major hand and power tools

  • The differences between chronic and acute health ailments

 

Why OSHA 10 training is valuable

For those who wish to take the OSHA 10 Construction Industry course, there are many benefits, especially for entry-level workers.

  • Helps keep crew members safe through peer training

  • Uses hands-on learning, encouraging trainees to participate

  • Tailors topics to the needs of the participants

  • Can be done on-site or online

 

Participants are trained on recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards within the construction industry. There’s also information about workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint.

OSHA 10 helps workers gain the knowledge and skills to maintain a safe work environment, and is an important ste0 toward mitigating workplace hazards.

When participants have completed their ten-hour training, they will receive a certification card or certificate. With the exception of Nevada, this certification does not have an expiration date.

Workplace safety is always a concern. That’s why OSHA 10 training and certification pair perfectly with a scalable labor management software. For those who wish to learn more about OSHA 10 and other OSHA requirements as they apply to construction sites, take a look at this free guide, OSHA Construction Safety Rules You Need to Know.

 

 

About the Author

Matthew Ramage

Matthew Ramage is Trimble's Segment Manager for Asset Management and the MEP Global Marcom Director. He leads a new marketing approach for his team, specializing in inbound and content-centric marketing.

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