Remote Construction Site Monitoring, Part 4: Perimeter Security

April 28, 2020

 

The demand for increasing jobsite security has only increased in recent years - making sure that only people with permission and the right documentation are allowed on our sites. We also need to make sure that while we have a reduced human presence, that we don’t see an increase in theft or intrusion. Perimeter security represents our most significant opportunity to protect our sites and our workers, keeping us all at work and production high.

Creating a safer, more secure, environment with secure perimeters

There are two main approaches to perimeter security: human presence at every opening and hard-access turnstiles.

For many years, common practice has relied on a security staffer with a clipboard, manual tracking of the ingress and egress of site personnel, plus manual tracking of key team-updates such as health checks and certifications. It’s difficult to track changing permissions of workers allowed on site manually, or on spreadsheets. If someone is banned from the site, or given access, the guards won’t have that information until someone has sent it to them.  

Use of an access control solution on handheld devices guards can carry builds a digital bridge between the trailer and access points. With each badge-scan, the system can automatically check a centralized database of permissions, updated in real time.  Like other site crews, the security staff need to follow safety protocols. As such, badge scanners that can operate at a safe distance (+6 feet) allow for safe interaction and optimized workflow.

Another perimeter security option, turnstiles, adds a physical barrier to the entry ports and uses ID cards to permit access. The key to this door is your ID card. When workers scan their ID cards against the turnstile, the system automatically  checks all permissions, training and documentation and allows access to only those in compliance. This helps reduce the instance of ‘walk-ons’, intruders, urban explorers, and the presence of any individuals who may compromise the safety and security of workers or your site. Modular turnstiles can be moved around the site as it changes, ensuring there is always a barrier whenever a human security guard is not present, and can remove some of the uncertainty climate calls for reduced staffing on site.

With no fence breaks, turnstiles provide a complete secure perimeter. This ensures that people without permission have a much more difficult time entering the site. This helps to reduce theft as the units are in place and operational 24/7. Coupled with on site security, you have a fantastic solution for making sure that administration work is reduced, security is improved. You can be more confident knowing your project is safer and only people with the right training, checks and credentials are on site.

Using CrewLane turnstiles on the jobsite
 
Ready to get started? Get a quote today on Trimble's access control systems.
Previous Article
Remote Construction Site Monitoring, Part 5: Contactless Entry
Remote Construction Site Monitoring, Part 5: Contactless Entry

There are 4 core actions that need to happen when workers enter a construction site during a public health ...

Next Article
Remote Construction Site Monitoring, Part 3: Communicating with Your Site
Remote Construction Site Monitoring, Part 3: Communicating with Your Site

The biggest reason broadcast messaging services fail, and alternatives for communicating with and alerting ...

A Fireside Chat with MEP Leadership: Building Resilience with Connected Construction [Webinar]

Register Today